Loading... Please wait...

Our Newsletter


 

News at the Farm

Maple Sugaring Season and Spring Family Fun at the Farm

sugarhouse.jpg Welcome to Spring at Sugarbush Farm.  March and early April finds the entire Luce family busy making maple syrup.  Maple sugaring is really family time because we are spending many hours together in the sugarhouse while Jeff, Ralph and Matt bring in the sap from the sugar woods and boil it down to make our Pure Vermont Maple Syrup

As the weather warms for sap flows, the snow slowly melts and Vermont's gravel roads turn to mud.  If you visit during mud season, be sure to wear your boots and hope your car is high enough to get through the ruts and mud.  Please call if you have questions about road conditions.

Precise weather is required for making syrup.  We need a cold night about 20 degrees F and then a warm sunny day in the 40's and low 50's for good sap flow. So we can never predict more than a few days ahead of time which days we will actually be boiling maple sap. Also check our Facebook page for maple sugaring and boiling updates.

sap-bucket1.jpg

We tap about 8,500 trees and hope to make about a quart from each tree.  We start making the Grade A golden color, delicate taste (formerly known as the Fancy syrup) syrup at the beginning of the season, then progress to Grade A amber color, rich taste, Grade A dark robust taste and end with Grade A very dark strong taste (formerly known as Grade B), just before the buds open and the season ends.

If you would like to visit, please call us at 800-281-1757 or send us an email at contact@sugarbushfarm.com and we will try to give you an idea of our sap boiling schedule.  Our sugarhouse is open every day even if we aren't boiling sap, so you can tour and get a good idea of how it works. Walk on our maple trail and see the buckets and sap lines.  Watch how our sap comes out of the tree and how it's collected.  On March 24th-26th our farm, along with others in the state, will celebrate Official Maple Open House Weekend.

sleigh-rides-025.jpg

By mid April it's usually warm enough that the buds start to open on the maple trees so the maple sap becomes bitter and sugaring is over for another year. Except, that is for the two weeks of cleaning up all the equipment back to an educational display.

 

May, our pasture fences are repaired from winter storms and then our herd of Angus beef cattle is put out to green pastures with their new babies. We hope to have about 50 new calves born by mid May and it's so much fun to see them romping in the grass. We have to start harrowing the fields for planting feed corn that will be harvested in the Fall. The leaves really come out on our trees about mid May and we feel it's safe to plant our gardens around Memorial Day.

springhorse.jpg